Program Planning

ART HISTORY AND VISUAL ARTS
FALL 2022 

COURSES FALL 2022              
Instructor Course # Course Title Points/Credits Type Day/Time Notes Online Application Link
Greg Bryda AHIS BC1001 Intro to Art History 4/TA Section Required Lecture M/W 2:40-3:55 Major Requirement All AH/VA  
To Be Announced AHIS BC2001 Drawing 3 Studio T 2:10-6pm No Application Required limited to 18/attend first class/priority to AH/VA majors
Irena Haiduk AHIS BC2003 Supervised Projects in Photography 3 Studio M 11-12:50 No Application Required limited to 18/attend first class/priority to AH/VA majors
Joan Snitzer AHIS BC2005/7 Painting 3 Studio W 2:10-6 No Application Required limited to 18/attend first class/priority to AH/VA majors
Jonathan Reynolds AHIS UN2602 Arts of Japan 3 Lecture M/W 10:10-12    
Anne Higonnet AHIS BC3667 Clothing 4/TA Section Required Lecture T/Th 2:40-3:55    
Alexander Alberro AHIS BC3682 Early Modernism and the Crisis of Representation 4/TA Section Required Lecture T/Th 4:10-5:25    
Irena Haiduk AHIS BC3933 Buoyancy 4 Seminar/Studio T 2:10-4pm Application Due April 8th 5pm https://forms.gle/sYperhquhV4Yd5b38
Joan Snitzer AHIS BC3530 Senior Thesis Studio I (BC AH VA Sr. Majors Only) 3 Majors Sr. VA Studio M 2:10-6 Requirement - VA Sr. Majors  
Rosalyn Deutsche AHIS BC3959 Senior Thesis Seminar (BC AH Sr. Majors Only) 3 Majors Sr. Seminar T 6:10-8 Requirement - AH Sr. Majors  
Piper Marshall AHIS BC3968 Art Criticism 4 Seminar T 11-12:50 Application Due April 8th 5pm https://forms.gle/8v49b6kWUxa38eyBA
Elizabeth Hutchinson AHIS BC3970 Section 1 Methods and Theories of Art History 4 AH Majors Seminar W 10:10-12 Requirement - AH Majors  
Alexander Alberro AHIS BC3970 Section 2 Methods and Theories of Art History 4 AH Majors Seminar Th 2:10-4 Requirement - AH Majors  
Anne Higonnet New Course #TBD Kimono Style at the Met 4 CU Bridge Seminar W 2:10-4

CU Application Due April 14th 

 

ART HISTORY FALL 2022 COURSES

Please visit the Columbia University Directory of Courses for an up-to-date list and day/time and room locations. Course info is subject to change. 

UNDERGRADUATE LECTURES


AHIS BC1001 INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY I (Barnard Course)
The first half of the Introduction to Art History explores premodern art and architecture around the world, from cave paintings to Song dynasty landscapes and Renaissance sculpture. Lectures and discussion sections are organized around themes, including nature and naturalism, death and the afterlife, ornament and abstraction, gender and sexuality, colonialism and conversion, and ritual and divinity. Visits to museums across New York are also an integral component to the course.
Note: weekly discussion groups to be arranged. Discussion Section Required.
Greg Bryda 4pts Monday and Wednesday 2:40-3:55pm Location: 304 Barnard Hall

AHIS UN2108 GREEK ART AND ARCHITECTURE (Columbia Course)
Introduction to the art and architecture of the Greek world during the archaic, classical, and Hellenistic periods (11th - 1st centuries B.C.E.).
I. Mylonopoulos 3pts T/TH 10:10-11:25am, Location: 612 Schermerhorn

AHIS UN2317 RENAISSANCE ARCHITECTURE (Columbia Course)
This course examines the history of architecture between roughly 1400 and 1600 from a European perspective outward. Employing a variety of analytical approaches, it addresses issues related to the Renaissance built environment thematically and through a series of specific case studies. Travelling across a geographically diverse array of locales, we will interrogate the cultural, material, urban, social, and political dimensions of architecture (civic, commercial, industrial, domestic, ecclesiastical and otherwise). Additional topics to be discussed include antiquity and its reinterpretation; local identity, style, and ornament; development of building typologies; patronage and politics; technology and building practice; religious change and advancements in warfare; the creation and migration of architectural knowledge; role of capitalism and colonialism; class and decorum in domestic design; health and the city; the mobility of people and materials; architectural theory, books, and the culture of print; the media of architectural practice; the growth of cities and towns; the creation of urban space and landscape; architectural responses to ecological and environmental factors; and the changing status of the architect. Discussion section required.
M. Waters 4pts M/W 1:10-2:25, 612 Schermerhorn Hall

AHIS UN2602 ARTS OF JAPAN (Barnard Course)
This course surveys the arts of Japan from the pre-historic era to the Edo period, with a particular focus on Buddhist art, sculpture and architecture, narrative handscolls, ink painting, decorative screens, and woodblock prints. Throughout the course, we will take close account of the broader cultural and historical contexts in which the arts were made. Other themes that we will cover include the ongoing tension in Japanese art between native traditions and foreign influences, the role of ritual in Japan's visual arts, artistic responses to multiple visual pasts and rupture from these pasts, the changing loci of patronage, and the formats and materials of Japanese art.
Jonathan Reynolds 3pts Monday and Wednesday 10:10am-12pm Location: To be Announced

AHUM UN2604 ARTS OF CHINA, JAPAN, AND KOREA (Columbia Course)
This course introduces distinctive aesthetic traditions of China, Japan, and Korea—their similarities and differences—through an examination of the visual significance of selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts in relation to the history, culture, and religions of East Asia. 
Nina Horisaki
Christens 3pts M/W 11:25-12:50 Location: 807 Schermerhorn

AHIS UN2702 PRE-COLUMBIAN ART AND ARCHITECTURE (Columbia Course)
The Western Hemisphere was a setting for outstanding accomplishments in the visual arts for millennia before Europeans set foot in the so-called “New World.” This course explores the early indigenous artistic traditions of what is now Latin America, from early monuments of the formative periods (e.g., Olmec and Chavín), through acclaimed eras of aesthetic and technological achievement (e.g., Maya and Moche), to the later Inca and Aztec imperial periods. Our subject will encompass diverse genre including painting and sculpture, textiles and metalwork, architecture and performance. Attention will focus on the two cultural areas that traditionally have received the most attention from researchers: Mesoamerica (including what is today Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador, and Honduras) and the Central Andes (including Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia). We will also critically consider the drawing of those boundaries—both spatial and temporal—that have defined “Pre-Columbian” art history to date. More than a survey of periods, styles, and monuments, we will critically assess the varieties of evidence—archaeological, epigraphic, historical, ethnographic, and scientific—available for interpretations of ancient Latin American art and culture.
Lisa Trever 3pts M/W 1:10-2:25 Location: 612 Schermerhorn

AHUM UN2802 ARTS OF ISLAM: REALIGNMENTS OF EMPIRE AND STATE ca 1000-1400) (Columbia Course)
This introductory survey course, open to both undergraduates and graduates, examines a broad spectrum of artistic and architectural developments across the Islamic World (Spain, North Africa, Middle East, and Central Asia) encompassing crucial political and territorial shifts that occurred in the late medieval period. Looking inward and outward, these shifts not only created new realities of empire and state, but also realigned engagements between a variety of Muslim societies with both European, African, and Asian steppe cultures, leading to new forms that articulate shifts in religious, political, intellectual and social practices. Through examining a series of test cases within a mainly chronological narrative, the course will cultivate clear visual analysis within particular cultural and material contexts. It will also develop experience with reading a variety of secondary and primary source materials in translation. This course is the second part of the series "Arts of Islam" and can be taken separately for credit. Discussion section required.
A. Shalem 4pts M/W 4:10-5:25pm Location: 612 Schermerhorn

AHIS BC3682 EARLY MODERNISM AND THE CRISIS OF REPRESENTATION (Barnard Course)
The artistic phenomenon that came to be called Modernism is generally considered one of the most pivotal in the history of late nineteenth and twentieth-century art. This course studies the emergence and development of Modernism in all of its complexity. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which Modern artists responded to the dramatically changing notions of space, time, and dimension in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. What impact did these dramatic changes have on existing concepts of representation? What challenges did they pose for artists? To what extent did Modernism contribute to an understanding of the full consequences of these new ideas of time and space? These concerns will lead us to examine some of the major critical and historical accounts of modernism in the arts as they were developed in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The course will focus specifically on the interrelationships between modernism and the expanding mass cultural formations of the industrial societies in Europe to address a wide range of historical and methodological questions. These include the emergence of modernism in the arts, the collapse of previous modes of representation, the development of new technologies of cultural production, the elaboration of the utopian projects of the avant-gardes, the unfolding of abstract art, the materialization of the readymade, as well as the transformation of concepts of artistic autonomy and cultural institutions. We will first investigate key modernist concepts developed in the late nineteenth century, as well as the crucial work of some of the artists of that moment. This will lead to an examination of the unfolding and consolidation of Cubism in the first decade of the twentieth century, followed by the development of Synthetic Cubism early in the 1910s. The third part of the course will study the impact of Cubism on artistic production in the following decade, focusing primarily on the Italian artists of Futurism, the German avant-garde in the context of Weimar culture, Dadaism, and the Russian and Soviet avant-gardes in the 1910s and 1920’s.
Note: weekly discussion groups to be arranged. Discussion Section Required.
Alexander Alberro 4 pts Tuesday and Thursday 4:10-5:25pm Location: 504 Diana Center

AHIS BC3667 CLOTHING (Barnard Course)
Human beings create second, social, skins for themselves. Across history and around the world, everyone designs interfaces between their bodies and the world around them. From pre-historic ornaments to global industry, clothing has been a crucial feature of people’s survival, desires, and identity. This course studies theories of clothing from the perspectives of art history, anthropology, psychology, economics, sociology, design, and sustainability. Issues to be studied include gender roles, craft traditions, global textile trade, royal sumptuary law, the history of European fashion, dissident or disruptive styles, blockbuster museum costume exhibitions, and the environmental consequences of what we wear today.            
Note: weekly discussion groups to be arranged. Discussion Section Required.  
Anne Higonnet 4pts Tuesday and Thursday 2:40pm-3:55pm Location: 304 Barnard Hall


UNDERGRADUATE SEMINARS

IMPORTANT INFORMATION REGARDING APPLYING FOR ART HISTORY SEMINARS
Barnard Art History seminars are limited to 15 students and require an application for admission. Please click on the links for each course application. 
Barnard seminar applications are due Friday April 8 at 5pm. 
The application deadline for CU seminars is Thursday, April 14th.
The application links can be found on the CU Directory of Classes in the course notes.

AHIS UN3410 APPROACHES TO CONTEMPORARY ART (Columbia Course)
This course examines the critical approaches to contemporary art from the 1970s to the present. It will address a range of historical and theoretical issues around the notion of "the contemporary" (e.g. globalization, participation, relational art, decolonization, Afrotropes, and artists publications) as it has developed in the era after the postmodernism of the 1970s and 1980s.
B. Joseph 4pts M 10:10-12 Location: 930 Schermerhorn


AHIS #TBD RESTITUTION OR REPATRIATION OF CULTURAL HERITAGE (Columbia Course)
Heated debates over restitution or repatriation of cultural heritage are reshaping museum practice and the law itself. It is an issue that has or will affect every branch of art history. Many museums have already become embroiled in the question of “who owns antiquity?” or who owns goods seized by the Nazis. The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) (1990) has mandated the return of thousands of individuals, funerary artifacts, and cultural objects to Native American tribes. In particular, this seminar is timed to assess the impact of the report released in Nov. 2018 in France recommending a policy of “swift” and permanent repatriation of African cultural heritage acquired during the colonial period to concerned nation states. The course will put into conversation histories drawn from diverse fields in the hope of developing some principles to negotiate competing moral and political claims.
Z. Strother 4pts Tuesday 10:10-12 Location: 832 Schermerhorn 

AHIS #TBD PICTURING PEOPLE: PHOTOGRAPHY & THE BODY IN THE U.S. (Columbia Course)
How did changing modes of representation reflect and contribute to shifting conceptions of embodiment and identity? This advanced undergraduate seminar explores the complex relationship between photography and the human body in the United States since the introduction of photography in 1839. Moving decade by decade, this course traces the development of photography alongside social and political change that altered how human bodies were understood, represented, inhabited, and controlled. We will examine a variety of photographic genres that figure the body, including personal portraits, ethnographic images, identification images, documentary photography, and fashion photography. Alongside the close examination of photographs, we will read key primary sources, scholarship in art history, and theoretical texts. Two field trips—one to Columbia’s Art Properties and one to the Metropolitan Museum of Art—will give us an opportunity to have our own embodied encounters with historical photographs. Although the course explores the period between 1839 and 1970, we will reflect upon the legacy of historical photographic practices in the years since and in the contemporary world.
K. Fein Tuesday 4pts Time to Be Confirmed Location: 832 Schermerhorn 

AHIS BC3933 BUOYANCY (Barnard Course)
“Be like a duck. Calm on the surface, but always paddling like the dickens underneath.” - Michael Caine. We do not live our own desires. Pressing ourselves into heavy molds not made for our bodies compresses us, tears our skin, and bruises our features. It is hard to breathe. We sink. Weight harbors the downward pull. It attaches itself in many ways but there are countless ways to set it down, to be free. This takes practice and skill. The common task of this visual arts seminar is to distinguish ourselves from the weight we carry. Through a variety or reading, writing, and making activities we shall seek out and contact levity: that gravity that changes our bodies, make us light of touch, aerates and propels us toward the state of buoyancy. Not for the faint of heart.
Enrollment Notes: THIS COURSE REQUIRES AN APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION DUE 4/8. Link to application: https://forms.gle/sYperhquhV4Yd5b38
Irena Haiduk 4pts Art History/Visual Arts Seminar Tuesday 2:10-4pm Diana Location: To be Announced

AHIS BC3968 ART CRITICISM (Barnard Course)
This course is a seminar on contemporary art criticism written by artists in the post war period. Such criticism differs from academic criticism because it construes art production less as a discrete object of study than as a point of engagement. It also differs from journalistic criticism because it is less obliged to report art market activity and more concerned with polemics. Art /Criticism I will trace the course of these developments by examining the art and writing of one artist each week. These will include Brian ODoherty/Patrick Ireland, Allan Kaprow, Robert Morris, Yvonne Rainer, Robert Smithson, Art - Language, Dan Graham, Adrian Piper, Mary Kelly, Martha Rosler, Judith Barry and Andrea Fraser. We will consider theoretical and practical implications of each artists oeuvre.
Enrollment Notes: THIS COURSE REQUIRES AN APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION DUE 4/8. Link to application: https://forms.gle/8v49b6kWUxa38eyBA
Piper Marshall 4pts Art History Seminar Tuesday 11-12:50pm Diana Location: To be Announced


BRIDGE SEMINARS

IMPORTANT INFORMATION REGARDING APPLYING FOR CU AH BRIDGE SEMINARS: CU AH bridge seminars are open to both CU graduate students and Barnard students. Bridge seminars are limited to 15 students with instructor’s permission and require a Columbia Art History application for admission.
The application deadline for CU seminars is Thursday, April 14th.
The application links can be found on the CU Directory of Classes in the course notes.

AHIS Course #TBD KIMONO STYLE AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART (Columbia Course)
In conjunction with an exhibition at the Met, and co-taught with Met curator Monika Bincsik, this bridge-level seminar studies the esthetics and history of the kimono. For centuries, Japanese kimonos were stable in shape yet fashionably volatile on their surfaces.  In the twentieth century, the kimono had a recurring and increasingly profound impact on fundamental Western concepts of clothing, notably through the work of Issey Miyake and Rei Kawakubo (Comme des Garçons).  Issues of use, accessorizing, gender identity, sumptuary rank, and textile technology will be addressed.  Most class sessions will be held at the Met, studying real examples of clothing from Met collections.
Anne Higonnet, 4 pts, Tentative Time: Wednesday 2:10-4pm

AHIS GU4646 FOUCAULT AND THE ARTS (Columbia Course)
Michel Foucault was a great historian and critic who helped change the ways research and criticism are done today – a new ‘archivist’. At the same time, he was a philosopher. His research and criticism formed part of an attempt to work out a new picture of what it is to think, and think critically, in relation to Knowledge, Power, and Processes of Subjectivization. What was this picture of thought? How did the arts, in particular the visual arts, figure in it? How might they in turn give a new image of Foucault’s kind of critical thinking for us today? In this course, we explore these questions, in the company of Deleuze, Agamben, Rancière and others thinkers and in relation to questions of media, document and archive in the current ‘regime of information’. The seminar is open to students in all disciplines concerned with these issues.
J. Rajchman 4pts Monday 4:10-6 Location: Schermerhorn 832 

AHIS #TBD THE BLACK MEDITERRANEAN (Columbia Course)
-Course Description to Come-
A. Shalem 4pts Tuesday 4:10-6pm Location: 832 Schermerhorn 
 
AHIS #TBD PHYSICAL AND VIRTUAL MEDIEVAL ARCHITECTURE (Columbia Course)
This seminar will explore the use of digital technologies in art history through studying new approaches to medieval art and architecture. For about thirty years, digital technologies have played an increasing role in the humanities. Recently, the phenomenon has significantly gained momentum. In the field of art history, this growth can be attributed to a wider availability of digital tools and the decreasing cost of advanced technologies. Lidar scanning, photogrammetry, virtual reality, high resolution photography, 3D modeling, and so on are now frequently part of art historical studies and publications. In this seminar, students are invited to evaluate the pros and cons of addressing digital technologies for art history. Starting from the subfield of medieval architecture, the seminar will address questions that appear today in many fields and periods of art history. The seminar will include hands-on practical experience. Students with or without technical skills are encouraged to join this seminar.
S. Van Liefferinge 4pts Wednesday 10:10-12pm Location: 930 Schermerhorn 

AHIS #TBD HADRIAN’S VILLA: THE ARCHEOLOGY OF AN IMPERIAL COURT (Columbia Course)
-Course Description to Come-
F. deAngelis 4pts Wednesday 6:10-8pm Location: 930 Schermerhorn 

AHIS #TBD AFRICAN AMERICAN VISUAL AND DEORATIVE ARTS, 1650-1900 (Columbia Course)
This course surveys the earliest forms of visual production by North Americans of African descent, spanning the period from 1650-1900. Our focus encompasses decorative arts and crafts (furniture, pottery, quilts), architecture, and the emerging field of African American archeology, along with photography and the fine arts of painting and sculpture. We will consider how certain traditions brought from Africa contributed to the development of the early visual and material culture of what came to be called the United States. We will also reflect on how theories of diaspora, and resistance help us understand African American and American culture in general.
K. Jones 4pts Thursday 10:10-12pm Location: 934 Schermerhorn

BARNARD ART HISTORY MAJOR REQUIRED COURSES

AHIS BC3530 ADVANCED SENIOR STUDIO I (Barnard Visual Arts)
The Fall Advanced Senior Studio serves as a forum for senior Visual Arts majors to develop their studio theses. The priorities are producing a coherent body of studio work and understanding this work in terms of critical discourse. The class is comprised of group critiques and small group meetings with the instructor. Visiting lecturers and professional workshops will also be scheduled and required. Each student will develop an independent body of visual work that is both personal, original and also speaks to the social conditions of our time. Each student will be able to articulate, verbally and in writing, their creative process. Each student will acquire professional skill that will support their artistic practice in the future. Each student will learn how to present and speak about their work publicly.
Enrollment Note: required course for Art History: Concentration in Visual Arts and limited to Barnard Senior Art History: Concentration in Visual Arts majors.
Joan Snitzer 4pts Monday 2:10-6:00pm Location: 600 West 116th Street 8th Floor VA Sr. Studios)

AHIS-BC3959 SENIOR RESEARCH SEMINAR (Art History Written Senior Thesis)
Independent research for the written Art History senior thesis. Students develop and write their senior thesis in consultation with an individual faculty adviser in art history and participate in group meetings scheduled throughout the senior year. Enrollment Note: course is limited to Barnard Art History Majors and required if you are writing an Art History senior thesis.
Rosalyn Deutsche 3pts Tuesday 6:10-8:00pm Diana Center Location to be Announced      

AHIS-BC3970 METHODS & THEORIES OF ART HISTORY (Barnard)
Introduction to critical writings that have shaped histories of art, including texts on iconography and iconology, the psychology of perception, psychoanalysis, social history, feminism and gender studies, structuralism, semiotics, and post-structuralism.
Enrollment Note: course is limited to Barnard Art History majors and is a course requirement for majors in Art History: Concentration in Art History.
SECTION 001 Elizabeth Hutchinson 4pts Wednesday 10:10-12pm Diana Center Location: TBD      
SECTION 002 Alexander Alberro 4pts Thursday 2:10-4pm Diana Center Location: TBD      

VISUAL ARTS COURSES   

Enrollment notes for Barnard VA studio courses: Courses limited to 18 students. Instructors’ permission is required. Students must attend the first day of class. Priority goes to AH/VA majors.

AHIS BC2001 DRAWING (Barnard Visual Arts)
This course will explore drawing as an open-ended way of working and thinking that serves as a foundation for all other forms of visual art. The class is primarily a workshop, augmented by slides lectures and videos, homework assignments and field trips. Throughout the semester, students will discuss their work individually with the instructor and as a group. Starting with figure drawing and moving on to process work and mapping and diagrams, we will investigate drawing as a practice involving diverse forms of visual culture.
Enrollment Notes: Limited to 18 students with instructors’ permission required. Students must attend first day of class. Priority goes to AH/VA majors.
Instructor to be Announced 3pts Tuesday 2:10-6pm Location: 402 Diana Center Visual Arts Studio

AHIS BC2005 and AHIS BC2007 PAINTING (Barnard Visual Arts)
This course will focus on individual and collaborative projects designed to explore the fundamental principles of image making. Students acquire a working knowledge of concepts in contemporary art through class critiques, discussion, and individual meetings with the professor. Reading materials will provide historical and philosophical background to the class assignments. Class projects will range from traditional to experimental and multi-media. Image collections will be discussed in class with an awareness of contemporary image production.
Enrollment Notes: Limited to 18 students with instructors’ permission required. Students must attend first day of class. Priority goes to AH/VA majors.
Joan Snitzer 3 points Wednesday 2:10-6pm Location: 402 Diana Center Visual Arts Studio

AHIS BC3003 SUPERVISED PROJECTS IN PHOTOGRAPHY (Barnard Visual Arts)
Designed for students to conduct independent projects in photography. Priority for enrollment to the class will be Barnard College students who are enrolling in classes at ICP (International Center of Photography). The cost of ICP will be covered by Barnard College. All of the other students enrolling in the course (CC, GS SOA) will be responsible for their own ICP course expenses. Students must attend the first class for enrollment consideration
Irena Haiduk 3 points Monday 11-12:50pm Location: 402 Diana Center Visual Arts Studio