Program Planning 2020-2021

ART HISTORY PROGRAM PLANNING
2020-2021

Although the past few months have been challenging for everyone, we in the Art History department hope that you are all safe and well. We have worked hard to make the course offerings and department-sponsored events for the fall exciting.

The department will host an online Zoom Program Planning Meeting for registered students on July 21st at 10am. Faculty will introduce their course offerings and discuss the major. In addition, important information will be provided on major advising, registration and the limited enrollment course sign up process for the fall semester. In an effort to keep our meeting secure, we are not posting the Zoom meeting link publicly. Art History majors will receive emails from the Dean of Studies office as well as the Art History Department with the Zoom meeting invitation and link. Please also feel free to email arthistory@barnard.edu if you are a registered student and we will provide the Zoom invitation and link. . 

If you have any questions as this unprecedented new round of program planning approaches, please feel free to contact Jonathan Reynolds (Art History Concentration), Joan Snitzer (Visual Arts Concentration), or any of our faculty. Let the adventure begin!

Jonathan Reynolds                 Joan Snitzer
Co-Chair, Art History              Co-Chair, Visual Arts

QUICK LINKS
Art History Major Requirements
Art History Written Senior Thesis
Visual Arts Requirements
Senior Project for Visual Arts
Art History Minor Requirements

IMPORTANT INFORMATION REGARDING APPLYING FOR BARNARD ART HISTORY SEMINARS
Barnard Art History seminars are limited to 15 students and most require an application for admission. See the enrollment notes listed along with with each seminar course for further instructions. Fall 2020 seminar applications are due no later than Friday, July, 24th at 5pm. Submit your typed application by email directly to the Art History Department office - arthistory@barnard.edu. The department will notify students if they have been accepted into a course via email by Wednesday, August 5th. 
- NOTE THE DEADLINE TO SUBMIT BC AH SEMINAR APPLICATIONS HAS BEEN EXTENDED TO FRIDAY, JULY 31st.- 
 DOWNLOAD A BARNARD ART HISTORY SEMINAR APPLICATION HERE

FALL 2020 ART HISTORY COURSES
Please confirm all course information by visiting the Columbia University Online Directory of Fall Art History Classes.  
·       Full semester courses will be held from Tuesday, September 8, 2020 – Wednesday December 23, 2020.
·       Fall A courses will be held from Tuesday, September 8, 2020 – Friday, October 23, 2020.
·       Fall B courses will be held from Monday, October 26, 2020 – Wednesday, December 23, 2020.


FALL 2020
Course Type

 

COURSE NUMBER

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

FULL Semester Course

AHIS BC1001

Intro to Art History I

Greg Bryda

FULL Semester Course

AHIS BC3626

In and Around Abstract Expressionism

Alex Alberro

FULL Semester Course

AHIS BC3667

Clothing

Anne Higonnet

FULL Semester Course

AHIS BC3530

Visual Arts Advanced Senior Studio

Irena Haiduk

FULL Semester Course

AHIS BC3668

Making Visual: A Tale of Two Cities

Joan Snitzer

FULL Semester Course

AHIS BC3840

Designing Design

Irena Haiduk

FULL Semester Course

AHIS BC3949

The Art of Witness

Rosalyn Deutsch

FULL Semester Course

AHIS BC3959

Art History Senior Research Seminar

Rosalyn Deutsche

FULL Semester Course

AHIS BC3968

Art Criticism I

John Miller

FULL Semester Course

AHIS BC3970-01

Methods And Theories of Art History

Jonathan Reynolds

FULL Semester Course

AHIS BC3970-02

Methods And Theories of Art History

Alex Alberro

FULL Semester Course

AHIS GU4045

Collecting

Anne Higonnet

FULL Semester Course AHIS GU4740 Re-Reading American Photographs Elizabeth Hutchinson

Fall A Courses

N/A

N/A

N/A

Fall B Course

AHIS BC2698

American Monument Cultures

Elizabeth Hutchinson

FALL 2020 UNDERGRADUATE LECTURES

AHIS-BC1001 INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY I (full semester course)
Attempting to offer an introduction to artistic creation on a global scale, this course is team-taught by specialists in a number of different cultural and historical traditions. In the fall semester we will discuss the art of Europe, the Middle East, India, Japan, and China, in periods ranging from the Paleolithic to the Renaissance. Museum trips are an integral part of the course. 
Gregory Bryda 4pts Monday and Wednesday 2:40pm-3:55pm Note: weekly discussion groups to be arranged. Discussion Section Required.

AHIS-BC2698 AMERICAN MONUMENT CULTURES (block B course)
Cities, institutions, and impassioned individuals are pulling down statues of people implicated in the histories of slavery, colonization and violence.  This class explores why monuments are important, how they have been used historically to assert political and social power and different points of view on where to go from here.  The nation is caught up in a vital debate about how historical figures and events should be recorded in the public square.  Spurred by protests in Charlottesville, VA in the summer of 2017 and moved forward during the uprisings against police brutality in the summer of 2020, cities, institutions and impassioned individuals are pulling down and removing statues of Confederate leaders and other individuals implicated in the histories of slavery, colonization and violence even as objections are raised to these actions from both the left and the right.  This activism led to the formation of a commission to study New York City’s built environment in fall 2017 and its resolution advocating both taking down and putting up monuments here. Why are Monuments so important?  How have they been used historically to assert political and social power?  This course introduces the history of monument culture in the United States, focusing on monuments related to three controversial subjects:  the Vietnam War, the Confederacy, and the “discovery” of America.  We will study when, by whom, and in what form these monuments were erected and how artists and audiences of the past and present have responded to them.  In addition to gaining historical background, students will engage in a digital project exploring the history and impact of monuments in a city or town with which they are familiar. Class meetings will combine lecture and discussion and will feature guest speakers most weeks.  To accommodate the online platform, each class will be broken into several units and will include both a break and short periods of independent or small group work.   In addition, students must complete online modules on conducting local research, podcasting, story maps, and timelines.                     
Elizabeth Hutchinson 3pts (Block B) Monday and Wednesday 1:10pm-2:25pm and Monday and Wednesday 2:40pm-3:55pm 

AHIS-BC3626 IN AND AROUND ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONISM (full semester course)
This course focuses on the history of modern art in the mid-twentieth century. To place mid-twentieth century modernism within its proper historical context, we will explore artistic practices elaborated between the 1920s and the 1960s in a wide range of different locations. We will also survey the major critical and historical accounts of modernism in the arts during these years. 
The course will first introduce the development of modernism, anti-modernism and avant-gardism in the period between the two World Wars, exploring the changing relationship between these cultural formations in Europe, the U.S.S.R., Mexico, and North America. The second part of the course will study the vicissitudes of modernism and avant-gardism in Europe, Latin America, and the U.S. during the 1930s and 1940s that led to the formation of Concrete art in Europe and Abstract Expressionism and the New York School in the United States. The third part of the course will examine the challenges to modernism and the reformulation of avant-gardism posed by the neo-avant-garde in North America, South America, Europe and Japan in the 1950s and early 1960s. The course will address a wide range of historical and methodological questions and problems.  These include: the challenges to the idea of artistic autonomy, the evolving concept of avant-gardism, the ongoing problematic of abstraction, the formal principles of serialism and the grid, the logic of non-composition, the persistence of figuration, the changing role of cultural institutions, the impact of new technologies on cultural production, and the emergence of new audiences and patrons for art.
Alexander Alberro Tuesday and Thursday 4:10pm-5:25pm Note: weekly discussion groups to be arranged. Discussion Section Required.

AHIS-BC3667 CLOTHING (full semester course)
Human beings create second, social, skins for themselves. Across history and around the world, everyone designs interfaces between their bodies and the world around them. From pre-historic ornaments to global industry, clothing has been a crucial feature of people’s survival, desires, and identity. This course studies theories of clothing from the perspectives of art history, anthropology, psychology, economics, sociology, design, and sustainability. Issues to be studied include gender roles, craft traditions, global textile trade, royal sumptuary law, the history of European fashion, dissident or disruptive styles, blockbuster museum costume exhibitions, and the environmental consequences of what we wear today.            
Anne Higonnet 4pts Tuesday and Thursday 2:40pm-3:55pm Note: weekly discussion groups to be arranged. Discussion Section Required.  

FALL 2020 UNDERGRADUATE BRIDGE LECTURES

AHIS G4045 COLLECTING (full semester course)
Collecting is among the most universal of human social phenomena. The course begins by studying the universality of collecting, exploring its range and hierarchies. Following a study of social, psychological, and anthropological theories of collecting, the course traces the history of collecting at its highest levels, from Renaissance princely collections to modern public art museums. The course is mostly about European and American collecting, but includes discussion of how art from all over the world has been collected. Special attention will be paid to preserved collections and art about collecting.
Anne Higonnet 4pts Tuesday and Thursday 8:40am-9:55am Note: weekly discussion groups to be arranged. Discussion Section Required for Undergraduates.

FALL 2020 UNDERGRADUATE SEMINARS 

IMPORTANT INFORMATION REGARDING APPLYING FOR BARNARD ART HISTORY SEMINARS
Most Barnard Art History seminars are limited to 15 students and require an application for admission. SEE THE ENROLLMENT NOTES LISTED ALONG WITH EACH COURSE FOR FURTHER INSTRUCTIONS. Fall 2020 seminar applications are due no later than Friday, July, 24th at 5pm. Submit your typed application by email directly to the Art History Department office - arthistory@barnard.edu. The department will notify students if they have been accepted into a course via email by Wednesday, August 5th. 

- NOTE WE HAVE EXTENDED THE DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS TO FRIDAY, JULY 31st.- 


DOWNLOAD A BARNARD ART HISTORY SEMINAR APPLICATION HERE

AHIS-BC3668 MAKING VISUAL: A TALE OF TWO CITIES (full semester course) DOWNLOAD A BARNARD ART HISTORY SEMINAR APPLICATION HERE - NOTE THE DEADLINE TO SUBMIT BC AH SEMINAR APPLICATIONS HAS BEEN EXTENDED TO FRIDAY, JULY 31st.- 
This seminar considers recent developments necessitated by classroom restrictions during the COVID-19 crisis. The course is designed to be flexible and some sessions may be held at NYC locations if conditions at the time permit, however, the experience of virtual communication is developing as one reads this course description. This course intends to advance visual skills that are both flexible and productive for communication in a global environment. Collaborating with creative educators from the digital and design fields living in Berlin, Germany, will enhance class participants' engagement and attention to online learning. The seminar's individual and collaborative projects and innovations can and will be useful well into the future with and without geographical and environmental restrictions.  Integrated into skills learned in a traditional studio course is a series of four workshops introducing class participants to relevant approaches for extending the reach of their artistic work through innovative technologies. The workshops' core focus is on learning essential conceptual and practical art studio skills hand-in-hand with the knowledge of technology and software platforms (Miro, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Premiere, SketchUp, Google Sheets, Google Slides, Keynote, Zoom, and Jitsi). By gaining facility both with the software platforms and collaborations without geographic restrictions, students have the opportunity to develop a broad range of communication strategies in digital and visual image production. Students will execute a series of individual and collaborative projects developed to enhance an understanding of visual subjects.
Joan Snitzer 4pts. Visual Arts/Seminar Wednesday 12:10pm-2:00pm + 2:30pm-3:30pm Break Out Sessions

AHIS-BC3840 DESIGNING DESIGN (full semester course)    COURSE DOES NOT REQUIRE AN APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION.  Students must attend first class for instructor’s permission.  Everything we contact has been designed. Design makes and unmakes desires on a global scale. It organizes our lives—from the way we move to the interface that tracks our movements. We’ve trained for the end for a while now, apocalypse is announced on every image channel. In a world, soon impossible to physically inhabit, the things we consume now consume us. The stakes have never been higher. To make a new world, we must use design. Our planet need not be disposed. It is an infrastructure for another one. To make contact with it we need to understand design as a value system for propelling possibility, not possession. The designed world requires new relation to things and fullness of use. As we read, write, experience and make our own projects, Designing Design helps us: acquire intimate knowledge of how we got here, recognize our historical allies and foes, and foster imagination and intelligence to live and make responsibly. In Fall 2020 Designing Design is tasked with designing a visual campaign for CUMC Mother's Center to support providing healthcare access for hight risk expecting mothers. This course requires no prior design experience. Enrolllment Notes: Students must attend first class for instructor’s permission .       
Irena Haiduk 4 pts. Visual Arts/Seminar Tuesday 2:10pm-4:00pm + 1 hour Break Out Sessions
                                              
AHIS-BC3949 THE ART OF WITNESS Memorials (full semester course) 
DOWNLOAD A BARNARD ART HISTORY SEMINAR APPLICATION HERE 
NOTE THE DEADLINE TO SUBMIT BC AH SEMINAR APPLICATIONS HAS BEEN EXTENDED TO FRIDAY, JULY 31st.- 

Examines aesthetic responses to collective historical traumas, such as slavery, the Holocaust, the bombing of Hiroshimia, AIDS, homelessness, immigration and the recent attack on the World Trade Center. Studies theories about trauma, memory and representation. Explores debates about the function and form of memorials. Rosalyn Deutsche 4pts Art History Seminar Wednesday 11:00pm-12:50pm Enrollment Notes: course limited to Juniors, Seniors and Graduate students only  

AHIS-BC3968 ART CRITICISM I (full semester course) 
DOWNLOAD A BARNARD ART HISTORY SEMINAR APPLICATION HERE 
NOTE THE DEADLINE TO SUBMIT BC AH SEMINAR APPLICATIONS HAS BEEN EXTENDED TO FRIDAY, JULY 31st.- 
This course is a seminar on contemporary art criticism written by artists in the post war period.  Such criticism differs from academic criticism because it construes art production less as a discrete object of study than as a point of engagement.  It also differs from journalistic criticism because it is less obliged to report art market activity and more concerned with polemics.   Art /Criticism I will trace the course of these developments by examining the art and writing of one artist each week.  These will include Brian O’Doherty/Patrick Ireland, Allan Kaprow, Robert Morris, Yvonne Rainer, Robert Smithson, Art & Language, Dan Graham, Adrian Piper, Mary Kelly, Martha Rosler, Judith Barry and Andrea Fraser.  We will consider theoretical and practical implications of each artist’s oeuvre.
John Miller 4pts Art History Seminar Tuesday 11:00pm-12:50pm


FALL 2020 BRIDGE SEMINARS


IMPORTANT INFORMATION REGARDING APPLYING FOR COLUMBIA ART HISTORY DEPARTMENT BRIDGE SEMINARS
Columbia University Art History bridge seminars are open to both graduate and undergraduate students. Barnard students may apply. Courses are limited to 15 students with instructor’s permission and require a Columbia Art History application for admission. DEADLINE TO APPLY IS MONDAY AUGUST 3rd at 5pm. LINK TO CU AH SEMINAR APPLICATION FORM

AHIS GU4740 RE-READING AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHY (full semester course)     COURSE REQUIRES AN APPLCATION FOR ADMISSION LINK TO CU AH SEMINAR APPLICATION FORM 
New methodologies for studying the history of photography drawing on affect theory, new materialism, explorations of circulation and exchange, and other scholarly trends vex established modes of American photo history and invite an expansion of the canon. This seminar surveys recent publications in photo theory and examples of photo history, including the fall 2020 special issue of Panorama on “Re-Reading American Photographs” to deepen our engagement with photographic works from the medium’s first century (1839-1939).
Elizabeth Hutchinson 4pt CU GU Bridge Seminar Tuesday 2:10pm-4:00pm

FALL 2020 ART HISTORY MAJOR REQUIRED COURSES

AHIS-BC3530 ADVANCED SENIOR STUDIO (full semester course)
The Fall Advanced Senior Studio serves as a forum for senior Visual Arts majors to develop their studio theses. The priorities are producing a coherent body of studio work and understanding this work in terms of critical discourse. The class is comprised of group critiques and small group meetings with the instructor. Visiting lecturers and professional workshops will also be scheduled and required. Each student will develop an independent body of visual work that is both personal, original and also speaks to the social conditions of our time. Each student will be able to articulate, verbally and in writing, their creative process. Each student will acquire professional skill that will support their artistic practice in the future. Each student will learn how to present and speak about their work publicly. Enrollment Note: course limited to Barnard majors in Art History: Concentration in Visual Arts 
Irena Haiduk 4pts Monday 2:10pm-6:00pm

AHIS-BC3959 SENIOR RESEARCH SEMINAR (full semester course)
Independent research for the senior thesis. Students develop and write their senior thesis in consultation with an individual faculty adviser in art history and participate in group meetings scheduled throughout the senior year. Enrollment Note: course limited to Barnard Art History Majors. Course does not need an application or instructor's permission.  
Rosalyn Deutsche 3pts Tuesday 6:10pm-8:00pm   

METHODS & THEORIES OF ART HISTORY (full semester course)
AHIS-BC3970-01 Jonathan Reynolds 4pts Wednesday 2:10pm-4:00pm
AHIS-BC3970-02 Alexander Alberro 4pts Tuesday 2:10pm-4:00pm
Introduction to critical writings that have shaped histories of art, including texts on iconography and iconology, the psychology of perception, psychoanalysis, social history, feminism and gender studies, structuralism, semiotics, and post-structuralism. Enrollment Note: course limited only to Barnard Art History majors and is a course requirement for majors in Art History: Concentration in Art History Course does not need an application or instructor's permission.  

FALL 2020 VISUAL ARTS COURSES

AHIS-BC3003 SUPERVISED PHOTOGRAPHY PROJECTS (full semester course)
Designed for students to conduct independent projects in photography. Priority for enrollment to the class will be Barnard College students who are enrolling in classes at ICP (International Center of Photography).  The cost of ICP will be covered by Barnard College. All of the other students enrolling in the course (CC, GS SOA) will be responsible for their own ICP course expenses.
John Miller 3pts Monday11:00am-12:50pm Enrollment Note: students must attend first class for instructor’s permission                

TENTATIVE SPRING 2021 ART HISTORY COURSES
Please confirm all course information by visiting the Columbia University Online Directory of Spring Art History Classes.  
·       Spring semester courses will be held from Monday, January 11, 2021 – Monday, April 26, 2021.
·       Spring A courses will be held from Monday, January 11, 2021 – Friday, February 26, 2021.
·       Spring B courses will be held from Monday, March 8, 2021 – Monday, April 26, 2021.
·       Course descriptions, sections and times, will be available in advance of early registration in November 2020.


SPRING 2021
Course Type

 

COURSE NUMBER

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

FULL Semester Course

AHIS BC1002

Intro to Art History

Anne Higonnet

FULL Semester Course AHIS BC2006/8 Painting 2006/8

Joan Snitzer

FULL Semester Course

AHIS BC2355

Apocalypse

Greg Bryda

FULL Semester Course

UN2406

20th Century Art

Alex Alberro

FULL Semester Course

AHIS BC3003

Supervised Projects  in Photography

John Miller

FULL Semester Course

AHIS BC3031

Imagery and Form
in the Arts

Joan Snitzer

FULL Semester Course

AHIS BC3531

Visual Arts Advanced Senior Studio

John Miller

FULL Semester Course

AHIS BC3910

Contemporary Photography and Related Media

Joanna Lehan

FULL Semester Course AHIS BC3957
The 1980's: Feminism and Postmodernism
Rosalyn Deutsche

FULL Semester Course

AHIS BC3960

Art History Senior Research Seminar

Rosalyn Deutsche

FULL Semester Course

AHIS BC3976

Japanese Photography

Jonathan Reynolds

FULL Semester Course

AHIS BC3982

Looking at the Dutch Golden Age

Adam Eaker

FULL Semester Course

AHIS BC3984

Curatorial Positions
1969-Present

Valerie Smith

FULL Semester Course

AHIS BC-TBD

Revolution and Art
New Seminar

Anne Higonnet

FULL Semester Course

AHIS W-TBD

New Medieval Bridge Lecture

Greg Bryda

FULL Semester Course

AHIS BC-TBD

New Barnard Teaches Undergrad Curatorial Seminar (Inuit Sculpture)

Elizabeth Hutchinson

Spring A Courses

N/A

N/A

N/A

Spring B Course

AHIS BC3666

Death Drive 3000 Irena Haiduk
Spring B Course AHIS BC- TBD New Designing Design II Irena Haiduk

Spring B Course

AHIS BC-TBD

New American Studies Senior Thesis Seminar

Elizabeth Hutchinson

TENTATIVE SPRING 2021 UNDERGRADUATE LECTURES

AHIS-BC1002 INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY II (full semester course)
The second part of the Introduction to Art History goes from about 1400 to 2015, circles the world, and includes all media. It is organized around one theme for each lecture, and approximately 100 works of art. Visits to New York museums and discussions sections are crucial parts of the course.

Anne Higonnet 4pts Monday and Wednesday 2:40pm-3:55pm Note: weekly discussion groups to be arranged. Discussion Section Required.


AHIS-BC2355 APOCALYPSE (full semester course)
This lecture course explores how art and architecture responded to changing attitudes toward death and the afterlife over the course of the European Middle Ages, from early Christian Rome to the dawn of the Protestant Reformation in Germany. Generally speaking, the course will chronicle the arts relating to medieval “eschatology”—or concerns over the fate of the soul at the end of time. We will analyze the visual culture associated with ordinary people preparing for their own death and the deaths of loved ones, saints and Biblical figures whose triumph in death served as exemplars for the living, and institutional and individual anxieties over humankind’s destiny on Judgment Day. Artworks under consideration will encompass various media and contexts, including monumental architecture and architectural relief sculpture, tomb sculpture, wall painting, manuscript painting, reliquaries, and altarpieces. Note: weekly discussion groups to be arranged. Discussion Section Required.
Greg Bryda 4pts Day/Time TBD

AHIS-UN2405 20th CENTURY ART (full semester course)
The course will examine a variety of figures, movements, and practices within the entire range of 20th-century art—from Expressionism to Abstract Expressionism, Constructivism to Pop Art, Surrealism to Minimalism, and beyond–situating them within the social, political, economic, and historical contexts in which they arose. The history of these artistic developments will be traced through the development and mutual interaction of two predominant strains of artistic culture: the modernist and the avant-garde, examining in particular their confrontation with and development of the particular vicissitudes of the century’s ongoing modernization. Discussion section complement class lectures. Course is a prerequisite for certain upper-level art history courses. Note: weekly discussion groups to be arranged. Discussion Section Required.
Alexander Alberro 4pts Day/Time TBD

TENTATIVE SPRING 2021 UNDERGRADUATE BRIDGE LECTURES

AHIS BC-TBD New Medieval Bridge Lecture
Course Description to Come
Greg Bryda 3pts Day/Time TBD

TENTATIVE SPRING 2021 ART HISTORY REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES

AHIS-BC3031 IMAGERY AND FORM IN THE VISUAL ARTS (full semester course)
Operation of imagery and form in dance, music, theater, visual arts and writing; students are expected to do original work in one of these arts. Concepts in contemporary art will be explored. Enrollment Note: course requirement for Art History Visual Arts Majors
Joan Snitzer 3pts Monday 2:10pm-4:00pm

AHIS-BC3531 ADVANCED SENIOR STUDIO II (full semester course)
A requirement for senior Visual Arts Majors in which students develop their studio theses in consultation with faculty advisers. Enrollment Note: COURSE ONLY OPEN TO SENIOR BARNARD ART HISTORY and VISUAL ARTS MAJORS AND IS A BARNARD VISUAL ARTS MAJOR REQUIREMENT. To be taken during the spring semester of the Senior year.  Enrollment note: 1 hour weekly required discussions to be arranged.
John Miller 4pts Monday 5:00pm-7pm


AHIS-BC3960 SENIOR RESEARCH SEMINAR (full semester course)
Independent research for the senior thesis. Students develop and write their senior thesis in consultation with an individual faculty adviser in art history and participate in group meetings scheduled throughout the senior year. Enrollment Note: course limited to Barnard Art History Majors 
Rosalyn Deutsche 3pts Tuesday 6:10pm-8:00pm   


TENTATIVE SPRING 2021 UNDERGRADUATE SEMINARS 
Important Enrollment Notes: All Barnard Art History seminars are limited to 15 students with instructor’s permission and require an application for admission. Applications are due TBD


AHIS-BC3666 DEATH DRIVE 3000 (block B course)   
“The aim of all life is death,” Sigmund Freud’s historic words do not appear strange today. Under siege of the perpetual breaking news cycle, the apocalypse is easy to imagine. Will it be an asteroid, a zombie virus or an all out nuclear war? Death Drive 3000 returns to the inanimate. Through a variety of reading, writing and making projects, this seminar studies the implications of our unbound and limitless death drive. Can any viable futures be located under the regimes of such imagination, futures that do not involve disposing of ourselves? From de Sade to Malabou to Clausewitz, topics include: primary nature, partial objects, necrosodomy, dismemberment, omophagia, suicide pacts, plagues, holocausts, total war and other symptoms of our collective end. Not for the faint of heart.
Irena Haiduk 4pts Day/Time TBD Visual Arts Seminar

AHIS-BC3910 CONTEMPORARY PHOTOGRAPHY AND RELATED MEDIA (full semester course)
Exhibitions of photography and video play a particular role in mirroring the present moment, which finds political themes front and center. Prevalent are exhibitions that redress (art) historical erasure, present counter histories, or take direct aim at specific governmental policies. 
Joanna Lehan 4pts Day/Time TBD

AHIS-BC3928 LOOKING AT THE DUTCH GOLDEN AGE (full semester course)
Course Description to Come
Adam Eaker 4pts Day/Time TBD

AHIS-BC3957 1980S FEMINISM AND POSTMODERNISM IN THE VISUAL ARTS (full semester course)          
Examination of art and criticism that is informed by feminist and postmodern ideas about subjectivity in visual representation which first achieved prominence in the late 1970s and 1980s, exerting a profound influence on contemporary aesthetic practice. Explored in relation to earlier concepts of feminism, modernism, social art history, and "art as institution." Artworks discussed include those of Barbara Kruger, Cindy Sherman, Louise Lawler, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Hans Haacke, Mary Kelly, and Catherine Opie, among others.
Rosalyn Deutsche 4pts Day/Time TBD

AHIS-BC3976 JAPANESE PHOTOGRAPHY (full semester course)
This course will examine the history of Japanese photography from the middle of the 19th century to the present. The class will be organized both chronologically and thematically. Throughout its history, photography has been an especially powerful medium for addressing the most challenging issues facing Japanese society. Among the topics under discussion will be: tourist photography and the representation of women within that genre in the late 19th century, the politics of propaganda photography, the construction of Japanese cultural identity through the representation of  “tradition” in photography, and the interest in marginalized urban subcultures in the photography of the 1960s and 1970s. Although the course will be focused on Japan, the class will read from the literature on photography elsewhere in order to situate Japanese work within a broader context.

Jonathan Reynolds 4pts Day/Time TBD

AHIS-BC3984 CURATORIAL POSITIONS, 1969-PRESENT (full semester course)
Contemporary exhibitions studied through a selection of great shows from roughly 1969 to the present that defined a generation. This course will not offer practical training in curating; rather it will concentrate on the historical context of exhibitions, the theoretical basis for their argument, the criteria for the choice in artists and their work, and exhibitions internal/external reception. Valerie Smith 4pts Day/Time TBD

AHIS-BC-TBD DESIGNING DESIGN II (block B course)   
Course Description To Come
Irena Haiduk 4pts Day/Time TBD Visual Arts Seminar

AHIS-BC-TBD REVOLUTION AND ART (full semester course)
Course Description To Come
Anne Higonnet 4pts Day/Time TBD

AHIS-BC-TBD BC TEACHES CURATORIAL SEMINAR (INUIT SCULPTURE) (full semester course)
Course Description To Come
Elizabeth Hutchinson 4pts Day/Time TBD

AHIS-BC-TBD AMERICAN STUDIES SENIOR THESIS SEMINAR (block B Course )
Course Description To Come
Elizabeth Hutchinson 4pts


TENTATIVE SPRING 2021 VISUAL ARTS COURSES


AHIS-BC2006/AHIS-BC2008 PAINTING (full semester course)
A continuation of painting I - III, open to all skill levels. Students will further develop techniques to communicate individual and collective ideas in painting. This course will focus on individual and collaborative projects designed to explore the fundamental principles of image making. Students acquire a working knowledge of traditional studio skills and related concepts in contemporary art through class critiques, discussion, and individual meetings with the professor. Reading materials will provide historical and philosophical background to the class assignments. Class projects will range from traditional to experimental and multi-media. Image collections will be discussed in class with an awareness of contemporary image production.
Joan Snitzer 3pts Wednesday 2:10pm-6:00pm Enrollment Note: students must attend first class for instructor’s permission        

AHIS-BC3003 SUPERVISED PHOTOGRAPHY PROJECTS (full semester course)
Designed for students to conduct independent projects in photography. Priority for enrollment to the class will be Barnard College students who are enrolling in classes at ICP (International Center of Photography).  The cost of ICP will be covered by Barnard College. All of the other students enrolling in the course (CC, GS SOA) will be responsible for their own ICP course expenses. Enrollment Note: students must attend first class for instructor’s permission      
John Miller 3pts Monday11:00am-12:50pm     

TENTATIVE SUMMER 2021 ART HISTORY COURSES

-courses to be announced-
 

Please confirm all course information by visiting the Columbia University Online Directory of Summer Art History Classes.  
·       Summer A courses will be held from Monday, May 3, 2021 – Friday, June 18, 2021.
·       Summer B courses will be held from Monday, June 28, 2021 – Monday, August 16, 2021.

·       Course descriptions, sections and times, will be available in advance of Summer registration in April 2021.