Program Planning Fall 2020

Download a fall 2020 program planning message from the Art History Department Chair 

Reminder - Barnard 2020 Fall registration period is from April 20-April 24. Please don't hesitate to contact your faculty advisor with questions and to have them sign off on your program. 

SPECIAL NOTE ON APPLYING FOR FALL 2020 BC ART HISTORY SEMINARS. 
There will not be a hand in application process this year. To be considered for enrollment in a seminar course, you are required to attend the first class meeting in September. Professors will decide on their roster the first day the class meets. NOTE: BC AH seminar courses are limited to 15 students with preference to senior majors. 

 

FALL 2020 ART HISTORY COURSES 

Download at a glance Fall 2020 Course List 

All courses listed below are subject to change. Courses are being added and edited so please confirm course information as well as (day/time/location), by visiting the Columbia online course directory.

UNDERGRADUATE LECTURES

AHIS-BC1001    INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY I
Attempting to offer an introduction to artistic creation on a global scale, this course is team-taught by specialists in a number of different cultural and historical traditions. In the fall semester we will discuss the art of Europe, the Middle East, India, Japan, and China, in periods ranging from the Paleolithic to the Renaissance. Museum trips are an integral part of the course. 
Gregory Bryda 4pts M/W 2:40 3:55 Note: weekly discussion groups to be arranged. Discussion Section Required.

AHIS-BC3626    IN AND AROUND ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONISM 
This course focuses on the history of modern art in the mid-twentieth century. To place mid-twentieth century modernism within its proper historical context, we will explore artistic practices elaborated between the 1920s and the 1960s in a wide range of different locations. We will also survey the major critical and historical accounts of modernism in the arts during these years. 
The course will first introduce the development of modernism, anti-modernism and avant-gardism in the period between the two World Wars, exploring the changing relationship between these cultural formations in Europe, the U.S.S.R., Mexico, and North America. The second part of the course will study the vicissitudes of modernism and avant-gardism in Europe, Latin America, and the U.S. during the 1930s and 1940s that led to the formation of Concrete art in Europe and Abstract Expressionism and the New York School in the United States. The third part of the course will examine the challenges to modernism and the reformulation of avant-gardism posed by the neo-avant-garde in North America, South America, Europe and Japan in the 1950s and early 1960s. The course will address a wide range of historical and methodological questions and problems.  These include: the challenges to the idea of artistic autonomy, the evolving concept of avant-gardism, the ongoing problematic of abstraction, the formal principles of serialism and the grid, the logic of non-composition, the persistence of figuration, the changing role of cultural institutions, the impact of new technologies on cultural production, and the emergence of new audiences and patrons for art.
Alexander Alberro T/TH 4:10-5:25
Note: weekly discussion groups to be arranged. Discussion Section Required.

AHIS-BC3667 CLOTHING
Human beings create second, social, skins for themselves. Across history and around the world, everyone designs interfaces between their bodies and the world around them. From pre-historic ornaments to global industry, clothing has been a crucial feature of people’s survival, desires, and identity. This course studies theories of clothing from the perspectives of art history, anthropology, psychology, economics, sociology, design, and sustainability. Issues to be studied include gender roles, craft traditions, global textile trade, royal sumptuary law, the history of European fashion, dissident or disruptive styles, blockbuster museum costume exhibitions, and the environmental consequences of what we wear today.
           
Anne Higonnet 4pts T/TH 2:40- 3:55 
Note: weekly discussion groups to be arranged. Discussion Section Required.
  

UNDERGRADUATE BRIDGE LECTURES

AHIS G4045 COLLECTING                             
Collecting is among the most universal of human social phenomena. The course begins by studying the universality of collecting, exploring its range and hierarchies. Following a study of social, psychological, and anthropological theories of collecting, the course traces the history of collecting at its highest levels, from Renaissance princely collections to modern public art museums. The course is mostly about European and American collecting, but includes discussion of how art from all over the world has been collected. Special attention will be paid to preserved collections and art about collecting.
Anne Higonnet 4pts T/TH 8:40-9:55 Note: weekly discussion groups to be arranged. Discussion Section Required for Undergraduates.

UNDERGRADUATE SEMINARS 
Note: Barnard Art History seminars are limited to 15 students with instructor’s permission. Students must attend the first day of class for roster selection. There will not be a hand in application process this year.

AHIS-BC3840    DESIGNING DESIGN
Everything we contact has been designed. Design makes and unmakes desires on a global scale. It organizes our lives—from the way we move to the interface that tracks our movements. We’ve trained for the end for a while now, apocalypse is announced on every image channel. In a world, soon impossible to physically inhabit, the things we consume now consume us. The stakes have never been higher. To make a new world, we must use design. 
Our planet need not be disposed. It is an infrastructure for another one. To make contact with it we need to understand design as a value system for propelling possibility, not possession. The designed world requires new relation to things and fullness of use. As we read, write, experience and make our own projects, Designing Design helps us: acquire intimate knowledge of how we got here, recognize our historical allies and foes, and foster imagination and intelligence to live and make responsibly. This course requires no prior design experience.
Irena Haiduk      4 pts. Tuesday 2:10- 4:00 + 1 hour Visual Arts lab
 

AHIS-BC3910    CONTEMPORARY PHOTOGRAPY AND MEDIA POLITICS  
An introductory survey of contemporary photography and related media through the framework of current exhibitions in New York City. Exhibitions of photography and video play a particular role in mirroring the present moment, which finds political themes front and center. Prevalent are exhibitions that redress (art) historical erasure, present counter histories, or take direct aim at specific governmental policies.  Through group outings to NYC galleries and museums (approximately 8 trips) we will take stock of which artists are showing, in what contexts, and unpack both artistic and curatorial strategies. In addition to class discussion of what we’ve seen, during our time in the classroom we will look back at the select landmark photography exhibitions, to chart evolutions in the medium and their interrelation with politics.            

Joanna Lehan  4pts Thursday 2:10-4:00                                                                                  

AHIS-BC3968    ART CRITICISM I 
This course is a seminar on contemporary art criticism written by artists in the post war period.  Such criticism differs from academic criticism because it construes art production less as a discrete object of study than as a point of engagement.  It also differs from journalistic criticism because it is less obliged to report art market activity and more concerned with polemics.   Art /Criticism I will trace the course of these developments by examining the art and writing of one artist each week.  These will include Brian O’Doherty/Patrick Ireland, Allan Kaprow, Robert Morris, Yvonne Rainer, Robert Smithson, Art & Language, Dan Graham, Adrian Piper, Mary Kelly, Martha Rosler, Judith Barry and Andrea Fraser.  We will consider theoretical and practical implications of each artist’s oeuvre.
John Miller 4pts Tuesday 11:00- 12:50

 AHIS-BC3949    THE ART OF WITNESS Memorials
An introductory survey of contemporary photography and related media through the framework of current exhibitions in New York City. Exhibitions of photography and video play a particular role in mirroring the present moment, which finds political themes front and center. Prevalent are exhibitions that redress (art) historical erasure, present counter histories, or take direct aim at specific governmental policies.  Through group outings to NYC galleries and museums (approximately 8 trips) we will take stock of which artists are showing, in what contexts, and unpack both artistic and curatorial strategies. In addition to class discussion of what we’ve seen, during our time in the classroom we will look back at the select landmark photography exhibitions, to chart evolutions in the medium and their interrelation with politics.           

Rosalyn Deutsche 4pts Wednesday 11:0012-:50 Limited to Juniors, Seniors and Graduate students)   

ART HISTORY MAJOR REQUIRED COURSES

AHIS-BC3970-01 METHODS & THEORIES OF ART HISTORY  Jonathan Reynolds 4pts Wednesday 2:10-4:00
AHIS-BC3970-02 METHODS & THEORIES OF ART HISTORY Alexander Alberro 4pts Tuesday 2:10-4:00
Introduction to critical writings that have shaped histories of art, including texts on iconography and iconology, the psychology of perception, psychoanalysis, social history, feminism and gender studies, structuralism, semiotics, and post-structuralism. Enrollment limited only to Barnard Art History majors. Course Required for majors in Art History: Concentration in Art History

AHIS-BC3959    SENIOR RESEARCH SEMINAR
Independent research for the senior thesis. Students develop and write their senior thesis in consultation with an individual faculty adviser in art history and participate in group meetings scheduled throughout the senior year. Enrollment limited to Barnard Art History Majors 
Rosalyn Deutsche 3pts Tuesday 6:10-8:00         

AHIS-BC3530    ADVANCED SENIOR STUDIO
The Fall Advanced Senior Studio serves as a forum for senior Visual Arts majors to develop their studio theses. The priorities are producing a coherent body of studio work and understanding this work in terms of critical discourse. The class is comprised of group critiques and small group meetings with the instructor. Visiting lecturers and professional workshops will also be scheduled and required. Each student will develop an independent body of visual work that is both personal, original and also speaks to the social conditions of our time. Each student will be able to articulate, verbally and in writing, their creative process. Each student will acquire professional skill that will support their artistic practice in the future. Each student will learn how to present and speak about their work publicly. Enrollment limited to Barnard majors in Art History: Concentration in Visual Arts 
Irena Haiduk  4pts Monday 2:10- 6:00


VISUAL ARTS COURSES
Students must attend first class for instructor’s permission

AHIS-BC2005  AHIS BC2007  PAINTING I and PAINTING III      
This course will focus on individual and collaborative projects designed to explore the fundamental principles of image making. Students acquire a working knowledge of concepts in contemporary art through class critiques, discussion, and individual meetings with the professor.  Reading materials will provide historical and philosophical background to the class assignments.  Class projects will range from traditional to experimental and multi-media. Image collections will be discussed in class with an awareness of contemporary image production.
Joan Snitzer 3pts Wednesday 2:10-6:00
 

AHIS-BC3003    SUPERVISED PHOTOGRAPHY PROJECTS                                                  
Designed for students to conduct independent projects in photography. Priority for enrollment to the class will be Barnard College students who are enrolling in classes at ICP (International Center of Photography).  The cost of ICP will be covered by Barnard College. All of the other students enrolling in the course (CC, GS SOA) will be responsible for their own ICP course expenses.
John Miller 3pts Monday11:00-12:50                     

          
Cross Listed Courses Counting for Art History Major Credit

ARCH-BC2505 LIFE BEYOND EMERGENCY: ARCHITECTURE HISTORY COLONIALISM HUMANITARIANISM
How do people live beyond emergency? What places and architectures do they make, and what are their poetics and politics? This course examines the connected histories of colonialism and humanitarianism through architecture in / beyond emergency. We will study iconic forms: refugee camps and detainment centers, colonial expositions and museums, UN headquarters and NGO field sites, and territories of consequence to colonial and national powers. We will study humanitarianism, an ideological manifestation of modernity and liberal thought, which is governed by the terms of urgency and rarely considered historically or in relation to colonial structures. We will study colonialism, which is usually understood as a historical period, rather than a condition enacted by architectural forms, spaces, and practices that extend into postcolonial and emergency contexts. This course introduces students to themes and cases through lectures, discussions of shared readings, and presentations of independent work by participants. No experience is required, and students with an interest in global histories are welcome.
Anooradha Siddiqi Lecture 3pts T/TH 1:10-2:25                                                  

ARCH-BC3901 HISTORIES OF ARCHITECTURE AND FEMINISM   (SENIORS ONLY)
What does it mean to write histories of architecture and feminism? Which stories are included and which excluded? How are race, sexuality, class, colonialism, ethnicity, and nation bound up with architecture in these histories? How are questions of domesticity linked with those of power? What is an architect? This seminar will examine these questions and others through historiographical practice and theory. Building upon recent interventions by scholars examining architecture, art, urbanism, geography, territory, ecology, technology, and material culture, we will examine how histories of architecture and feminism have been 
narrated and shaped. In our class discussions, we will examine the objects and methods of histories that concern themselves with architecture—defined broadly as well as narrowly—and study how scholars using feminist approaches have attempted to write those histories. Syllabus Available Upon Request. Contact the AH office for further info.
Anooradha Siddiqi seminar 4pts Wednesday 4:10-6:00 Instructor’s permission required. Attend first class to apply.