SPRING 2023 PROGRAM PLANNING

SPRING 2023 BARNARD ART HISTORY COURSES

PLEASE NOTE ALL COURSE LISTINGS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.
FOR A LIST OF ALL SPRING 2023 ART HISTORY COURSES OFFERED 
PLEASE VISIT THE
CU DIRECTORY OF COURSES AND THE COLUMBIA ART HISTORY WEB PAGE.

NOTE BOTH THE BARNARD AND COLUMBIA UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR APPLICATIONS
ARE DUE NO LATER THAN THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10th @5pm


BARNARD UNDERGRADUATE LECTURES

AHIS BC1002 INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY II
The second part of the Introduction to Art History goes from about 1400 to 2015, circles the world, and includes all media. It is organized around one theme for each lecture and approximately 100 works of art. Visits to New York museums and discussion sections are crucial parts of the course.
Enrollment Notes: 1-hour weekly TA-led discussion section required.
GER Designation: Foundations, Distributional Requirement: Arts and Humanities
GER Designation: Foundations, Modes of Thinking: Thinking through Global Inquiry and Thinking with Historical Perspective
Instructor: Anne Higonnet
Day/Time Offered: Monday and Wednesday 2:40-3:55, 4 Credits
Location: Julius Held Lecture Hall, 304 Barnard Hall

AHIS BC2628 AMERICAN MONUMENT CULTURES
Cities, institutions, and impassioned individuals are pulling down statues of people implicated in the histories of slavery, colonization and violence.  This class explores why monuments are important, how they have been used historically to assert political and social power and different points of view on where to go from here.  The nation is caught up in a vital debate about how historical figures and events should be recorded in the public square.  Spurred by protests in Charlottesville, VA in the summer of 2017 and moved forward during the uprisings against police brutality in the summer of 2020, cities, institutions and impassioned individuals are pulling down and removing statues of Confederate leaders and other individuals implicated in the histories of slavery, colonization and violence even as objections are raised to these actions from both the left and the right.  This activism led to the formation of a commission to study New York City’s built environment in fall 2017 and its resolution advocating both taking down and putting up monuments here. Why are Monuments so important?  How have they been used historically to assert political and social power?  This course introduces the history of monument culture in the United States, focusing on monuments related to three controversial subjects:  the Vietnam War, the Confederacy, and the “discovery” of America.  We will study when, by whom, and in what form these monuments were erected and how artists and audiences of the past and present have responded to them.  In addition to gaining historical background, students will engage in a digital project exploring the history and impact of monuments in a city or town with which they are familiar. Class meetings will combine lecture and discussion and will feature guest speakers most weeks.     
GER Designation: Foundations, Modes of Thinking, Thinking Technologically and Digitally and (to be confirmed) Thinking Locally New York City              

Instructor: Elizabeth Hutchinson
Day/Time Offered: Monday and Wednesday 10:10am-11:25am, 3 Credits
Location to be Announced

AHIS BC3626 IN AND AROUND ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONISM
This course focuses on the history of modern art in the mid-twentieth century. To place mid-twentieth century modernism within its proper historical context, we will explore artistic practices elaborated between the 1920s and the 1960s in a wide range of different locations. We will also survey the major critical and historical accounts of modernism in the arts during these years.    The course will first introduce the development of modernism, anti-modernism and avant-gardism in the period between the two World Wars, exploring the changing relationship between these cultural formations in Europe, the U.S.S.R., Mexico, and North America. The second part of the course will study the vicissitudes of modernism and avant-gardism in Europe, Latin America, and the U.S. during the 1930s and 1940s that led to the formation of Concrete art in Europe and Abstract Expressionism and the New York School in the United States. The third part of the course will examine the challenges to modernism and the reformulation of avant-gardism posed by the neo-avant-garde in North America, South America, Europe and Japan in the 1950s and early 1960s.   The course will address a wide range of historical and methodological questions and problems.  These include: the challenges to the idea of artistic autonomy, the evolving concept of avant-gardism, the ongoing problematic of abstraction, the formal principles of serialism and the grid, the logic of non-composition, the persistence of figuration, the changing role of cultural institutions, the impact of new technologies on cultural production, and the emergence of new audiences and patrons for art.
Enrollment Notes: 1-hour weekly TA-led discussion section required.
GER Designation: Foundations, Distributional Requirements: Arts and Humanities
GER Designation: Foundations, Modes of Thinking: Thinking about Social Difference and Thinking with Historical Perspective
Instructor: Alexander Alberro

Day/Time Offered Tuesday and Thursday 4:10pm-5:25pm, 4 Credits
Location to be Announced

AHIS BC3675 FEMINISM AND POST MODERNISM
Examines art and criticism of the 1970s and 1980s that were informed by feminist and postmodern ideas about visual representation. Explores postmodernism as (1) a critique of modernism, (2) a critique of representation, and (3) what Gayatri Spivak called a radical acceptance of vulnerability. Studies art informed by feminist ideas about vision and subjectivity. Places this art in relation to other aesthetic phenomena, such as modernism, minimalism, institution-critical art, and earlier feminist interventions in art.  

GER Designation: Foundations, Distributional Requirements: Arts and Humanities

GER Designation: Foundations, Modes of Thinking: Thinking about Social Difference and Thinking with Historical Perspective
Instructor: Rosalyn Deutsche
Day/Time Offered: Tuesday and Thursday 1:10-2:25pm, 3 Credits
Location to be Announced


BARNARD UNDERGRADUATE SEMINARS

IMPORTANT INFORMATION REGARDING APPLYING FOR ART HISTORY SEMINARS
Barnard Art History seminars are all limited to 12 students and require an application for admission.

Barnard Art History seminar course applications are due THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10th at 5pm. 
The application deadline for Columbia Art History seminars is also November 10th at 5pm.
See the CU AH website for further info on their undergraduate seminars.

 

AHIS BC3831 NEW YORK CITY ART MUSEUMS
NOTE AHIS BC3831 NEW YORK CITY ART MUSEUMS IS A NEW COURSE AND MAY NOT BE LISTED YET ON THE CU DIRECTORY OF CLASSES 

New York City is home to one of the world’s best museum ecologies. This seminar studies that ecology by museum type, against the backdrop of the city’s cultural, economic, and social history. How can theories of collecting explain different museum types? How do museums anchor municipal identity? Class sessions will alternate between discussion sessions at Barnard and field trips to museums. Field trip sessions will start onsite at 10:20 and end by 11:40 to allow for travel time.
Enrollment Notes: BC AH seminars are limited to
12 students, and require an application for admission due 11/10. Link to Online Application
GER Designations: TBD
Instructor: Anne Higonnet 
Day/Time Offered: Wednesday 10:10am-12pm, 4 Credits
Location to be Announced

AHIS BC3928 SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY DUTCH PAINTING
This course is devoted to a close examination of Dutch art of the seventeenth century, one of the most celebrated chapters in the history of art. Students will be exposed to seminal art historical texts on the period, at the same time as they receive exposure to connoisseurship, conservation, and technical art history.
Enrollment Notes: BC AH seminars are limited to
12 students, and require an application for admission due 11/10. Link to Online Application
GER Designation: Foundations, Modes of Thinking: Thinking with Historical Perspective
Instructor: Adam Eaker 
Day/Time Offered: Monday 10:10am-12pm, 4 Credits
Location to be Announced

AHIS BC3976 JAPANESE PHOTOGRAPHY
This course will examine the history of Japanese photography from the middle of the 19th century to the present. The class will be organized both chronologically and thematically. Throughout its history, photography has been an especially powerful medium for addressing the most challenging issues facing Japanese society. Among the topics under discussion will be: tourist photography and the representation of women within that genre in the late 19th century, the politics of propaganda photography, the construction of Japanese cultural identity through the representation of “tradition” in photography, and the interest in marginalized urban subcultures in the photography of the 1960s and 1970s. Although the course will be focused on Japan, the class will read from the literature on photography elsewhere in order to situate Japanese work within a broader context.
Enrollment Notes: BC AH seminars are limited to
12 students, and require an application for admission due 11/10. Link to Online Application

GER Designation: Foundations, Distributional Requirements: Arts and Humanities
GER Designation: Foundations, Modes of Thinking: Thinking with Historical Perspective
instructor Jonathan Reynolds 
Day/Time Offered: Wednesday 2:10pm-4:00pm, 4 Credits
Location to be Announced

AHIS BC3984 CURATORIAL POSITIONS 1969-PRESENT
Contemporary exhibitions studied through a selection of great shows from roughly 1969 to the present that defined a generation. This course will not offer practical training in curating; rather it will concentrate on the historical context of exhibitions, the theoretical basis for their argument, the criteria for the choice in artists and their work, and exhibitions internal/external reception.
Enrollment Notes: BC AH seminars are limited to12 students, and require an application for admission due 11/10. Link to Online Application

GER Designation: Foundations, Modes of Thinking: Thinking with Historical Perspective
Instructor: Valerie Smith 
Day/Time: Thursday 10:10am-12pm, 4 Credits
Location to be Announced


   COLUMBIA ART HISTORY BRIDGE SEMINARS OPEN TO UNDERGRADUATE BARNARD STUDENTS       

AHIS GU4089 NATIVE AMERICAN ART
This introduction to Native North American art surveys traditions of painting, sculpture, ceramics, textiles, photography, and architecture and traces the careers of contemporary Indian modernists and postmodernists. It emphasizes artistic developments as a means of preserving culture and resisting domination in response to intertribal contact, European colonization, and American expansion.
Instructor: Elizabeth Hutchinson
Day/Time: Monday and Wednesday 2:40-3:55pm, 3 Credits
Location to be Announced


BARNARD ART HISTORY MAJOR REQUIRED COURSES

AHIS BC3531 ADVANCED SENIOR STUDIO II (Barnard Visual Arts Senior Theses)
Advanced Senior Studio II is a critique class that serves as a forum for senior Visual Arts majors to develop and complete one-semester studio theses. The priorities are producing a coherent body of studio work and understanding this work in terms of critical discourse. The class will comprise group critiques and small group meetings with the instructor. Field trips and visiting artist lectures will augment our critiques. Further information about the Visual Arts senior thesis. 

Enrollment Note: Required course for Art History: Concentration in Visual Arts and limited to Barnard Senior Art History: Concentration in Visual Arts majors.
Instructor: Irena Haiduk

Day/Time: Monday 10:10am-2pm (note 4 hours), 4 Credits
Location: 600 West 116th Street 8th Floor VA Sr. Studios

AHIS BC3960 SENIOR RESEARCH SEMINAR (Barnard Art History Written Senior Thesis)
Independent research for the written Art History senior thesis. Students develop and write their senior thesis in consultation with an individual faculty adviser in art history and participate in group meetings scheduled throughout the senior year. Further information about the BC AH written senior thesis.  
 Enrollment Notes: course is limited to Barnard Art History Majors and is required if you are writing an Art History senior thesis.
Instructor: Rosalyn Deutsche

Day/Time: Tuesday 6:10-8:00pm, 3 Points
Location to be Announced   

BARNARD VISUAL ARTS COURSES   

Enrollment notes for Barnard VA studio courses: Courses limited to 18 students. No application process but the instructor's permission is required. Students must attend the first day of class. Priority goes to AH/VA majors.

AHIS BC3003 SUPERVISED PROJECTS IN PHOTOGRAPHY (Barnard Visual Arts)
Designed for students to conduct independent projects in photography. Priority for enrollment to the class will be Barnard College students who are enrolling in classes at ICP (International Center of Photography). The cost of ICP will be covered by Barnard College. All of the other students enrolling in the course (CC, GS SOA) will be responsible for their own ICP course expenses.  

Enrollment Notes: Art History majors receive enrollment preference. The course can only be taken 3 times. Application is not required. ICP course enrollment is required. 
GER Designation: Foundations, Distributional Requirements: Arts and Humanities
GER Designation: Foundations, Modes of Thinking: Thinking Technologically and Digitally
Instructor: Irena Haiduk
Day/Time: Tuesday 10:10-12pm, 3 Credits
Location: 402 Diana Center Visual Arts Studio

AHIS BC3031 IMAGERY AND FORM IN THE ARTS (Barnard Visual Arts Majors Required Course)
Operation of imagery and form in dance, music, theater, visual arts and writing; students are expected to do original work in one of these arts. Concepts in contemporary art will be explored.
Enrollment Notes: Art History with a Visual Arts Concentration major requirement, Enrollment is limited to BC AH/VA majors. 
GER Designation: Foundations, Distributional Requirements: Arts and Humanities
Instructor: Joan Snitzer
Day/Time: Monday 2:10-4pm, 3 Credits
Location: 402 Diana Center Visual Arts Studio

COURSES IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS THAT COUNT TOWARDS THE ART HISTORY MAJOR COURSE REQUIREMENT.

Architecture UN3117 MODERN ARCHITECTURE IN THE WORLD
Prerequisites: Designed for but not limited to sophomores; enrollment beyond 60 at the discretion of the instructor. How has architecture been “modern”? This course will introduce students to things, practices, figures, and ideas behind this contentious and contradictory concept, emerging in multiple locations around the world. Students in this course will learn about architecture as it was practiced, taught, thought, and experienced across landscapes of social and cultural difference during the past two centuries. Learning about the past through historical consciousness around architecture and investigating the history of architecture as a discursive field are fundamental to liberal arts thinking generally, and important for students in architecture, the history and theory of architecture, art history, and urban studies. Students in this course will be introduced to: Architecture as enmeshed with other forms of cultural production Culturally-specific intellectual and public debates around the architectural and urban Makers, thinkers, and organizers of the designed or built environment Geographies, territories, and mobilities associated with architecture as an end or means for material extraction, refinement, trade, labor, and construction sites, institutions, media, events, and practices which have come to hold meaning Modernity, modernism, and modernization in relation to each other, as social, cultural, and technological drivers holding stakes for past events as well their histories. In this course, we will ask questions about ideas and practices within disparate socially-and culturally-constructed worlds, and across other asymmetries. For example, can we draw a coherent historical thread through Lisbon in 1755, Bombay in 1854, Moscow in 1917, the moon in 1969, and al-Za’atari refugee camp in 2016? Are such narratives of coherence themselves the trace of the modernist impulse in architectural history? In this course, we will study modern architecture’s references to an art of building as well the metaphors it gives rise to. Embedded in this examination are social and cultural questions of who made and thought modern architecture, and aesthetic and historical questions around the figure of the architect.
Instructor: Ralph Ghoche
Day/Time: Tuesday/Thursday 4:10pm-5:25pm
Location to be Announced

QUICK LINKS TO THE ONLINE APPLICATIONS

AHIS BC3831 New York City Art Museums Instructor: Anne Higonnet Link to Online Application

AHIS BC3928 Seventeenth-Century Dutch Painting  Instructor: Adam Eaker Link to Online Application

AHIS BC3976 Japanese Photography Instructor Jonathan Reynolds Link to Online Application

AHIS BC3984 Curatorial Positions 1969-Present Instructor: Valerie Smith Link to Online Application

- PLEASE CAREFULLY READ THE BELOW VERY IMPORTANT LIMITED ENROLLMENT COURSE PROTOCOLS-
Please email the BC AH office asap if, after you have been accepted into a course, you decide not to register. This way, we can admit a student off the waitlist. If you have been accepted into a course, you are still required to attend the first class meeting in January to secure your spot If you do not attend the first class meeting in January, you will lose your spot and the professor will assume you are not taking the course and will admit a another student off the waitlist.